Thursday, October 6, 2016

A visit to the new Le Cordon Bleu in Paris

It was our last day in Paris before heading back to the US of A - what to do, what to do.  Steve had a cemetery investigation project on his hit list, and I had been wanting to visit Le Cordon Bleu, so off I went to do just that.

I had learned not too many months ago that LCB Paris had built a brand new facility on the Quai André Citroën in the 15th arrondisement, right down the street from the Eiffel Tower and in sight of the Statue of Liberty (the French have the original you know) sitting in the middle of the Seine.


Lady Liberty

I found the school without difficulty, although it is a bit of a metro ride on the 10.  A quick walk down Quai André Citroën and I was there.


Somewhat spaceship like in appearance, it's a far cry from the old LCB with its unassuming facade and entryway.  My, those were the days.

One enters via the stairway next to the orange structure you see above.  The space inside is light, spacious and airy with a friendly woman at the reception desk asking how she could help.  When I explained that I'm an alum and would love to see the new school, she promptly called to see if someone was available to give me a tour.


Philippe Rocheron is the school's public relations man and served as my guide.  He and I had actually communicated by email some months ago when I was expressing some interest in their new Diplôme de Boulangerie.  It was nice to put a face with the name.  

There weren't any classes actively in progress for us to visit, but there were a lot of students sitting out in the open areas having their lunch before going into the practical kitchens a bit later.

I was particularly interested in the boulangerie kitchen and was impressed by the wooden topped work tables (my favorite surface on which to work with dough!) and the well equipped space.  Ahhhh - maybe someday.


On the main level there is a small cafe that sells goods made by the chefs at LCB.  As the students become more savvy about production and become more accomplished at things like laminated dough, their end results also go into the case.



My how things have changed - and for the better I might add.

Thanks for the tour Philippe!

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